Will low reps get you strong?

A lot of people who we see on a day to day basis often have the same burning question when it comes to lifting: “Will high weight and low reps make you stronger?” The answer to this question is more complicated than you might think. Here, we’re going to have a look at this in a bit of depth, but take note that this article mainly applies to compound exercises, such as your bench press or squat.

High Weight

Firstly, we have to define what is actually meant by high weight. For most of you reading this, you may think that a 150kg squat is really heavy, in fact its likely too much for you to lift. If we then asked some competitive power lifters what they thought of lifting that weight, then the chances are they’ll laugh and tell us 150kg is “nothing but a peanut”.

What we’re trying to get across here is that the phrase high weight is simply relative to what you can lift: if you have a bench press PR of 100kg, then chances are that a heavy weight for you is 75kg or more. On the other hand, if you can bench 200kg (don’t worry, we’re talking hypothetically) then a heavy weight for you is likely to be 150kg or more.

To sum this up:

  • A heavy weight is relative to your own strength
  • It is typically at least 75% of your PR (or one rep max)

So does this mean you should train at 75% or 100% of your PR? Well you ideally want to be training within that range, sometimes nearer 75% and sometimes very close to your PR. Like with most things, variety is the spice of life, and the key to getting stronger.

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Low reps

So you’ve heard from your local gym rat that low reps is the way to go for getting strong: only bodybuilders lift for high reps and they’re all weak. Now we won’t lie to you, there is some truth in this, but again we need to explore it a little bit more. Most people in the gym, which probably includes you, like to train for at least 10 reps. They love to train for that pump and feel the burn: sadly, it’s not really going to get them or you much stronger.

Most scholars out there agree that the rep ranges you choose will benefit you in different ways

  • 1-5 Reps: Strength
  • 6-8 Reps: Strength and Hypertrophy
  • 9-12 Reps: Hypertrophy
  • Higher Reps: Endurance

As you can see, the two areas which are best for promoting strength are the 1-5 and 6-8 rep ranges. Now we imagine that most of you reading this probably weren’t aware that 8 reps could be good for building strength as it doesn’t really seem low, so hopefully this clears things up for you.

Now, like we said with the weight you should be using, you should be mixing up your rep ranges as well. Putting two and two together, we can see that there’s a pretty obvious link that arises: you aren’t going to be lifting 95% of your one rep max for 8 reps. There’s also not much point in trying to lift 80% of your one rep max for 2 reps as it will be far too easy. Which leads us on to our final point

How many reps for a given weight

  • 1 rep = 100%
  • 2 reps = 92-95%
  • 3 reps = 90-93%
  • 4 reps = 87-90%
  • 5 reps = 85-87%
  • 6 reps = 82-85%
  • 7 reps = 80-83%
  • 8 reps = 75-80%

Note: This is estimated and can vary depending on your levels of endurance. It is however a very good indicator for how much weight you should be lifting depending on your recommended number of reps.


We hope that we’ve now cleared up for what exactly is meant by high weight low reps and you can make some educated decisions on how much weight you should be lifting. Like we said, you should eventually use a variety of rep ranges to achieve your goals and become a stronger person. If you are after a programme to help start you out, check out the EHF Beginner Programme, which is full of information and guidance.

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De-loading: The Best Week of your Life

Over the past week, apart from being extremely busy, I performed my first ever de-load week. For those of you that are unaware of what a de-load week is, our friends at bodybuilding.com have a perfectly reasonable definition at hand:

“A de-load is a planned reduction in volume or intensity, whose purpose is to allow the body to dissipate accumulated fatigue, allow you to fully recover and prepare you for further gains.”

The goal of de-loading is to allow you to become stronger, faster and bigger by putting in a week of active recovery in your workout plan. A de-load week is better than taking whole rest week because de-loading allows you to keep making progress as a lifter without abandoning training altogether for a week. Besides from this, it is recommended that you do some physical activity regularly throughout the week. Were you really going to do nothing all week?! (I’m shocked if you said yes).

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Some of the biggest benefits of de-loading

  • Allowing your central nervous system to recover from fatigue.
  • Reduce the risk of overtraining.
  • Allow you to take your mind off lifting heavy for a short period of time

And most of all:

  • Prepare you for more gains!

How to de-load properly

  • Do your normal routine workout with half the weight you currently work at.
  • Or: Use the same weight but DRASTICALLY decrease the volume i.e. the number of reps you perform the exercise at.
  • Focus on refining the form of your major lifts and isolating exercises.

And finally:

  • Enjoy the week! Do something you may not regularly do in the gym. I myself have rarely used a medicine ball to train, but last week I did a couple of balance exercises using it.

Photo Credit:
http://tonygentilcore.com/2012/01/the-deload-week-and-why-you-should-use-it/

http://www.crossfitready.com/2014/06/wendler-deload-week/